Is Astrology Scientifically Accurate?

I’m guessing you already know the answer

Image by InspiredImages from Pixabay

Western Astrology

The current system used in Western countries is based on the work of the Greek scholar Ptolemy in the 2nd century CE. The twelve signs of the zodiac represent 12 constellations that the sun moves through as the year progresses. These star signs, also known as sun signs, are divided into earth, air, water, and fire elements, all of which are associated with certain characteristics.

If you have a yod aspect, made up of two quincunxes joined by a sextile, you are restless and unstable.

And if you think I was making those words up, you would be wrong.

Is it starting to seem a bit out there yet?

Constellations and Astronomy

The zodiac is based on 12 constellations in the night sky. So what exactly is a constellation? Essentially, constellations are made up based on patterns viewed in the night sky that (very loosely) resemble certain shapes. The reason I call them made up is that the stars involved don’t actually have any relationship to each other whatsoever; they just look like they do from where we’re situated.

Yet the fundamentals of astrology have been scientifically tested and have failed with flying colours.

Any of the proposed mechanisms for astrology to work, such as gravity or electromagnetism, fly in the face of established scientific principles.

Confirmation bias

Confirmation bias is a type of cognitive bias, a shortcut that the brain takes to avoid having to think about things more than necessary. Confirmation bias means that we tend to pay the most attention to things that confirm what we already believe, and filter out things that are contrary to our beliefs.

What NASA has to say

According to NASA, the way the sun lines up with the constellations in the present day doesn’t actually match the traditional zodiac. A blog post by NASA states:

Mental health blogger | Former MH nurse | Living with depression | Author of 3 books, latest is Managing the Depression Puzzle | mentalhealthathome.org